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Jewish

Folktale Friday

Do you want to read some Jewish Folktales? Well, you are in luck… we have plenty in the collections at the Center for Jewish History! There are over 400 books categorized under the “Jews—Folklore” category; and nearly 700 under the “Folklore” category. Some highlights you can read here at the Center for Jewish History –  (Note these are all in English. We have many…

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“The First Jewish Feminist:” Ernestine Rose By Jackie Brettschneider, Research Intern, Center for Jewish History Ernestine Rose is popularly known as the first Jewish feminist. It didn’t take her long to realize that women weren’t treated the same way as men. Her views were extremely progressive even from a young age, and she stated that, “I was a rebel at the age of five.”….

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This image is from the first Jewish queer zine – it is preserved in the Jewish Counter Culture collection (Call number I-504) in the archives of the American Jewish Historical Society here at the Center. This artifact will be part of a special display during an upcoming program presented by the American Jewish Historical Society on June 23rd: Changing Lives, Making History: CBST –…

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The Molly Picon Story, Part 6: “Isn’t She Wonderful?”

With this post, we wrap up Sarah Ganton’s series on Molly Picon, for decades a household name in Yiddish theater and vaudeville, then a Broadway star and performer with the USO, then a radio personality. We’re very fortunate to have a rich record of her life through the archives of the American Jewish Historic Society, one of the five partners of the Center of Jewish…

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The Molly Picon Story, Part 5: Postwar Europe–and Radio

We continue Sarah Ganton’s story of Molly Picon, for decades a household name in Yiddish theater and vaudeville, then a Broadway star and performer with the USO, then a radio personality. We’re very fortunate to have a rich record of her life through the archives of the American Jewish Historic Society, one of the five partners of the Center of Jewish History. Join us in…

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The Molly Picon Story, Part 4: The War, English Songs and the Great White Way

We continue Sarah Ganton’s story of Molly Picon, for decades a household name in Yiddish theater and vaudeville, then a Broadway star and performer with the USO, then a radio personality. We’re very fortunate to have a rich record of her life through the archives of the American Jewish Historic Society, one of the five partners of the Center of Jewish History. Join us in…

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A Somber Trove of Family Letters

by Kevin Schlottmann, Archival Services Manager, Center for Jewish History The Leo Baeck Institute’s Milli Frank correspondence (AR 6686) contains dozens of letters and postcards sent to Milli Frank in Brooklyn, New York, between 1937 and 1944, by her parents, aunts and uncles in Germany. Later, some of these relatives wrote to her from the concentration camps of France. None of them appears to…

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The Molly Picon Story, Part 2: A Star (and a Romance) Is Born

We continue Sarah Ganton’s story of Molly Picon, for decades a household name in Yiddish theater and vaudeville, then a Broadway star and performer with the USO, then a radio personality. We’re very fortunate to have a rich record of her life through the archives of the American Jewish Historical Society, one of the five partners of the Center of Jewish History. Join us in celebrating…

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From Vaudeville to “Fiddler”: (Re)introducing Molly Picon, the “Jewish Charlie Chaplin”

We’re delighted to kick off a series close to our hearts: the story of Molly Picon, for decades a household name in Yiddish theater and vaudeville, then a Broadway star, performer with the USO and radio personality–not to mention Yente the Matchmaker in Fiddler in the Roof. Some called her "the Jewish Charlie Chaplin"; others, “the Jewish Helen Hayes.” We think she stands grandly on her own.  Former…

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Your Family History, Our Incredible Archives: A Story in the New York Press

A human-family tree stands by the renovated genealogy institute at the Center for Jewish History in Manhattan. Photographs of couples, children, families, molecular matter, and, atop the trunk, Rosalind Franklin—the British Jewish scientist whose work helped Watson and Crick imagine the double helix—adorn the branches. (Description via the New York Press.)  We’re thrilled to see today’s New York Press story about “the intensity of personal…

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